Top 5 Photography Activities to do with your Kid

In today’s world where children are tech savvy and are adept at typing before they can write, even toddlers find it pretty easy to use a camera. Photography is one of the best ways to bond and connect with your child.

In addition to that, your kid will have an advantage of becoming famous as people love to have their photographs clicked. We have compiled a list of Top 5 photography activities that you can do with your kid, and they can do with other kids. These exercises along with being fun are also great tools and opportunities to learn and interact with others.

Here is our list:

  1. Create a photo story: Kids have a fantastic sense of imagination. When it comes to story time, kids love to hear them. Use this as an opportunity to improve their sense of creativity and sequential thinking skills. Kids can spin great yarns. You can channel this into using photos to tell stories. You can team up with your kids and click ten random images. Then you can arrange the pictures in various sequences. Then let them enact or write a story such that each picture is connected to the other sequentially.

Once you have got their creative minds into story writing mode, you can keep improving and improvise on the story. You can also give them photos of the family and get them to write a story about what had happened and when.

You can also start a Family Journal. This will help you bond well with your child, and it will be an absolute treasure for your child when they grow up. You can add photographs taken on special occasions by your kid, of the whole family. You can use an opportunity of relatives coming over or festivities like Christmas and New Year to have your kid take photographs for the family journal. You can also encourage your kids to take family photos and use them on Festival cards which you can send to friends and family.

  1. Learn Numbers, Colors and other elementary things: A visual medium like photography is a great way to teach children. No one likes to be sat down and explained, but tell them that it’s a game and they will readily play it. You can do the same with photography. You can teach them shades and nuances and subtle differences in color. Every time your kid clicks a snap, you can check it along with them and then ask which the colors in the photograph are.

This way they will learn to identify colors and shades, and the best thing is that they will remember it. You can also do the same with counting the number of photographs taken or the number of items in each photo. You can also teach them easy stuff like reading alphabets captured in the picture or even basic maths.

The best way a kid can learn is when it doesn’t seem like learning and seems more like a game they are playing. In addition to them learning new things and improving their photography skills, you also get to spend quality time with them.

  1. Teach them to use photo editing software: In today’s world, editing and improving on things are the norm. With technology giving you editing software for free both on your Mac or PC and on your smart phone, your kid can have a fantastic time learning how to create and edit great photos. There are many sites like Canva and Pic Monkey which are excellent and are free. Instagram and Snapchat too give you entertaining editing features for kids. You can use these tools to work with your kid in editing photographs and improving their editing skills.
  2. Teach your Kid to identify interesting objects to photograph: One of the most important things that your kid needs to learn while they are learning photography is how to click photographs of items of their interest. Each person has a different set of things they like. While some children may get scared of spiders, others may love to click the intricate web made by the spider and its balance on the web. Similarly, some kids may love to click photographs of nature, others may like to click pictures of architecture, and yet others may love to click pictures of people. Understand what your kid wants to take photographs of and then teach them the basics of photography for that type of photography.
  3. Photo Competitions: Another great activity that you and your spouse can do with your kid or kids is organizing a Photo Scavenger Hunt. You can make teams and then as a group embark on an adventure to take a photograph of as many things as you possibly can, beginning with a particular letter. For example, how many individual things can you find that start with ‘P’ ?.

You can give a list of things to them that they can go and find. You can then compare which team has clicked the most and then declare the winner. You could also try a game such that the first person who can photograph something beginning with a particular vowel would win. In this way, you can envision and create many scenarios where you challenge the kids to think and identify objects along with clicking them.

Another great way of teaching them is to set up a challenge or if you have more than one kid, make it as a game. The game could be to stroll around the house and click photographs of various objects that are of a similar color, and they can compete with each other. Or they can click photographs of objects which start with a particular type of phonetic. Or they can search for objects that begin with the letters which are there in their name.

I hope you liked our article on the top photography activities you can do with your kids. Do mention in the comments below the ones you liked best and if you have any suggestions or have tried any other activity.

Bio:

Dan Barr is a photographer, a parent to two girls, and the founder of KidsCameraGuide.com, a blog that is all about teaching photography to kids and kids cameras. You can visit Dan at his website www.kidscameraguide.com or connect with him on Facebook or Pinterest.

Smart Health Solutions for Kids

14 Natural Health Remedies for Children

Whether your child has a tummy ache, a stuffy nose, or a bug bite, doctors say that old-fashioned home remedies are often the best way to help him/her feel better fast. These time-tested treatments rarely have side effects, cost next to nothing, and use items you probably already have on hand. “Some, like ginger and chamomile, have even been confirmed by scientific studies to have healing effects,” says Hilary McClafferty, MD, a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ provisional section for complementary, holistic, and integrative medicine.
Of course, you should always call your pediatrician if your child’s problem seems serious. But the next time your child has a minor ache or injury, you can find these smart solutions all throughout your house.

Smart Health Solutions for Kids

 

Honey and Lemon Juice for a Sore Throat

Lemon dries up congestion and honey provides a soothing coating, says Lane Johnson, MD, associate professor of clinical family and community medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. In fact, a recent study found that a spoonful of honey eased kids’ coughs even better than cough medicine. Mix together a tablespoon of each, microwave for 20 seconds until warm (not hot), and have your child swallow the mixture a teaspoon at a time. Caution: Honey is not safe for babies under 1 year.

 

Baking Soda for Bug Bites

“My nana used to make a baking-soda paste for me when I was a child, and when I tried it on my own kids, they said that it stopped the itching better than store-bought products,” says Estelle Whitney, MD, an ob-gyn in private practice in Wilmington, Delaware. The alkaline baking soda helps counteract the acidic swelling, she explains. Mix a teaspoon of baking soda with just enough water to make a thick paste, smear it on the bites, and let it dry.

 

Cayenne Pepper for Nosebleeds

This spice helps blood clot, and it has been used medicinally in cultures around the world, says pediatrician Lillian Beard, MD, author of Salt in Your Sock and Other Tried-and-True Home Remedies. Keep your child’s head upright and pinch his nostrils together for several minutes. Then sprinkle a pinch of ground cayenne pepper on a moistened cotton swab and dab inside the nose on the area of the bleeding. “It seems like it might sting but, surprisingly, it doesn’t,” says Dr. Beard.

Junk Drawer: Duct Tape for Warts

The gray fabric tape seems to irritate warts — which can be surprisingly stubborn — and inhibit their growth. Place a small piece on the skin over your child’s wart, but not so tightly that it hurts, says Dr. Johnson. Change the tape whenever it starts to get icky; in about a month, the wart should be gone.

A Bubble Wand for Anxiety

Breathing slowly and deeply will help your child relax when she’s feeling stressed, says Lonnie Zeltzer, MD, director of the pediatric pain program at Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA and author of Conquering Your Child’s Chronic Pain. Have your child blow long, slow streams of bubbles from the soapy wand.

 

A Bandanna for Headaches

Wrapping several ice cubes in a dish towel will help soothe your child’s head pain (never place ice directly on his skin because it’ll burn), but it’ll be hard for him to hold it in place for long, says Dr. Beard. To keep the towel-wrapped ice from slipping, press it against his forehead or temples and secure it with a bandanna tied at the back of his neck.

 

A Sock for Tummy or Neck Pain

Instead of buying a heat wrap, make one by filling a sock with uncooked rice and tying it closed with a string, says Paula Gardiner, MD, a researcher in the department of family medicine at Boston University Medical Center. Microwave the sock for one minute or until warm, and place it wherever your child has pain. When it cools off, microwave it again.

 

Your Blow-Dryer for Swimmer’s Ear

This painful inflammation of the outer ear traps liquid and possibly bacteria. If the area has become infected, your pediatrician will probably prescribe antibiotic drops. But for mild cases, you can try evaporating the trapped water by standing a foot away from your child and aiming the dryer — on the warm (not hot) setting — at her ear, says Dr. Beard.

 

Contact Lens Solution for Congestion

For a child over 6 months, fill a bulb syringe with preservative-free saline solution, raise her head, and gently squeeze solution into one nostril at a time, says Dr. McClafferty. (Do it in the bath or over the sink.) In fact, a recent study found that using a nasal wash with a seawater solution (not yet available in the U.S.) helped kids get over colds faster — and made them less likely to get sick again.

 

 

Fresh Ginger Tea for Car Sickness

“Ginger stops the stomach contractions that tell your child’s brain he feels nauseous,” says Dr. McClafferty. For children ages 2 and older, add a teaspoon of shredded fresh ginger to four ounces of boiling water, and let it steep for four to five minutes. You can add a bit of honey to make it taste better. After it has cooled, have your child drink it a half hour before getting into the car.

 

Cucumber for Mild Swelling

If you go to a fancy spa, the facialist may use this salad staple to ease the puffiness around your eyes. That’s because cool cucumber slices help soothe hot, swollen skin. You can place a slice anywhere your child has minor swelling, Dr. Beard suggests, and then simply replace it with another slice from the fridge after it becomes warm.

A Credit Card for a Bee Sting

If a bee or wasp stings your child, remove the stinger to prevent additional venom from entering the wound. In order to avoid squeezing the stinger, which can spread the venom, use the flat edge of a credit card to gently scrape across the area until the stinger comes out.

A Stick of Gum for Indigestion

If your child is age 4 or older, have her chew some gum when she complains of a full stomach after a big meal. “The extra saliva she’ll produce will neutralize the problematic excess stomach acid,” says gastroenterologist Anil Minocha, MD, author of Natural Stomach Care.

All content on this Web site, including medical opinion and any other health-related information, is for informational purposes only and should not be considered to be a specific diagnosis or treatment plan for any individual situation. Use of this site and the information contained herein does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Always seek the direct advice of your own doctor in connection with any questions or issues you may have regarding your own health or the health of others.
Article source: Parents.com

Back To School Info For Parents, Too!

Fall is just around the corner, and, with it, back to school!  Getting your kids ready is one thing, but are you ready?  Here are 55 articles compiled by Marilyn Price-Mitchell, PhD (see original article here) for you guys — PARENTS!

This popular list of back-to-school articles is updated each year. It contains some of the latest thinking and research on learning, achievement, family well-being, parent engagement, special needs children, youth sports, media, technology, discipline, homework, bullying — all the things parents think about at back-to-school time. These articles also support the development of core abilities every child should have — curiosity, sociability, resilience, self-awareness, integrity, resourcefulness, creativity, and empathy (The Compass Advantage). The list is divided by parenting topic, with a short summary of what you will find in each article.

For “big picture” thinking about education and child development, check out my free eBook Reframing Success: Helping Children & Teens Grow from the Inside Out. It shows how grades and test scores are only one aspect of success and how we all nurture vital skills and abilities in young people. For the beginning of the 2016 school year, we’ve added a new section of RESOURCES and free downloads at Roots of Action,including the very popular Parenting Promise, and a handout on the Compass Advantage framework, showing how parents and schools impact eight core abilities in youth.

Please read the articles below that pique your interest now and bookmark others for later. And if you like particular authors, be sure to follow their articles throughout the school year by signing up for their newsletters. I’ve also included links to their Twitter accounts and Facebook pages to make following your favorites easy.

I guarantee you’ll find some meaningful food for thought here – whether it’s back-to-school time or anytime! You’ll also meet some great people who support children’s positive growth and well-being. Happy reading!

Back-to-School Basics: Learning & Achievement

55 Best Back-to-School Articles for Parents, by Marilyn Price-Mitchell PhD

  1. Learning to Be Human by Sophie Gilbert in The Atlantic. Why the humanities are in decline and why they’re more vital than ever. Twitter

2. Educating an Original Thinker by Jessica Lahey in The Atlantic. How teachers and parents can identify and cultivate children who think creatively and unconventionally. Twitter; Facebook

3. Teaching Beyond the Transmission of Knowledge by Miguel Angel Escotet, Ph.D. A call to action for teachers: Why teaching to the test inflicts a cost on students. Twitter

4. The Developmental Psychologists’ Back-to-School Shopping List by Gabrielle Principe, Ph.D., at Psychology Today. Five ways to improve children’s learning at all ages, grounded in scientific research.

5. The Key to Success in Within Your Child’s Developing Mind by Michele Borba, Ed.D., at Roots of Action. Changing the way your child thinks about empathy positively affects their life long relationships and success. Twitter; Facebook

6. A Link Between Relatedness and Academic Achievement by Ugo Uche, LPC, at Psychology Today. The key to student success relies not just with the teacher’s attitude toward the student, but also with the student’s attitude towards the teacher. Parents help develop these attitudes! Twitter

7. Parents & Teachers: 6 Ways to Inspire the Teen Brain by Sandra Bond Chapman Ph.D., at Psychology Today. Get tips to stimulate the teen brain from findings in neuroscience. Twitter

8. Seven Ways to Encourage Reluctant Readers by Steve Reifman, M.Ed.  A teacher’s strategies can turn your child from a reluctant to a willing reader. Try them out! Twitter; Facebook

9. The Coddling of the American Mind by Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt in The Atlantic. Will your children become good critical thinkers? A look at the trend to protect children from feeling uncomfortable. Gregg’s Twitter; Jonathan’s Twitter

10. The Success Myth by Heidi Grant Halvorson, Ph.D., at Psychology Today. Rethink your ideas of what makes us succeed, then apply them to your parenting. Twitter

Family Well-Being

11. Positive Parenting: Six Tips for Channeling Calm So You Don’t Yell at Your Kids by Rebecca Eanes at Positive Parenting. Controlling anger is important work for parents. Learn your triggers before you react. Twitter; Facebook

12. Managing Screen Time Increases Family Joy by Rachel Macy Stafford at Roots of Action. Modeling the healthy use of technology can increase the well-being of your entire family. This article describes six small changes that have big impacts! Twitter; Facebook

13. Beginning Family Meetings by Jody McVittie, M.D., at SoundDiscipline. Back-to-school time is perfect for planning regular family meetings. TwitterFacebook

55 Best Back-to-School Articles for Parents, by Marilyn Price-Mitchell PhD14. 11 Ways to Raise a Child Who is Entitled and Rudeby Christine Carter, Ph.D. at Positively Positive. A great list of what NOT to do with your children! TwitterFacebook

15. The Benefits of Play are “Oh, so Big!” by Katie Hurley at Roots of Action. Why parents should make time for lots of unstructured play time at home. TwitterFacebook

16. Relationships are the Key to Performance not Ability by Rick Ackerly at the Genius in Children. Learn why family and school relationships have the most impact in helping  kids develop well-being and learning to succeed in life. Twitter

17. Positive Parenting: How to Follow Through With Limits by Ariadne Brill at Positive Parenting Connection. Excellent advice on why and how parents should set limits, particularly with young children. TwitterFacebook

18. 4 Surprising Ways to Support a Child’s Self-Regulation & Avoid Melt Down by Lindsey Lieneck. A great article on mindful strategies that brings kids’ awareness to their bodies and help them manage their emotions. Twitter; Facebook

19. It Isn’t Easy Being a Parent by the Search Institute. Nine strategies every parent should know based on fostering developmental assets in children. Twitter; Facebook

20. Healthy Parenting after the Marriage Ends by Kevin D. Arnold, Ph.D., at Psychology Today.  How to support your children’s social, emotional and intellectual health after divorce. Twitter

21. Sibling Rivalry: Helping Children Learn to Work Through Conflicts by Laura Markham, PhD, at Roots of Action. Should parents intervene when siblings fight with one another? What’s the best way to help kids learn to work things out for themselves? Twitter; Facebook

Parent-Readiness and Engagement

55 Best Back-to-School Articles for Parents, by Marilyn Price-Mitchell PhD

22. Parent Involvement: The Missing Key to Student Achievement by James Norwood, Ph.D., at Teaching in the Middle. Learn why developing a partnership with school is one of the most important things you can do to help your child. Twitter

23. 9 Tips for Parents if Your Child is Changing Schools by Meryl Ain, Ed.D., at Your Education Doctor. Must-read tips for parents to help children get comfortable in a new school.  Twitter; Facebook

24. The Unique Power of Afterschool Learning by Leah Levy at Edudemic. Learn how afterschool programs impacts child development and what to look for in programs that “get it right.” Twitter

25. The Case for Dedicated Dads by Jessica Lahey at The Atlantic. Research shows that fathers play a critical role in their children’s education. Twitter

26. Developing Belief Systems About Education: It Takes a Village by Nicole Rivera, Ed.D., at Psychology Today. Children develop beliefs about education through what their parents believe.

27. Top 10 Pinterest Boards for Parents by Cathy James at the NurtureStore. If you are looking for educational projects to do with preschool and elementary school-age children at home, Pinterest is the place to be! TwitterFacebook

Back-to-School Anxiety

55 Best Back-to-School Articles for Parents, by Marilyn Price-Mitchell PhD28. Back-To-School Worries by Eileen Kennedy-Moore, Ph.D., at Psychology Today. How to help children cope with starting a new school year. Twitter; Facebook

29. Ease Back-to-School Stress by Christine McLaughlin at SchoolFamily. How to help your child switch from the laid-back fun of summer to homework and routine. TwitterFacebook

Children with Special Needs, Abilities & Personalities

30. Escaping the Disability Trap by Alia Wong at The Atlantic. A compelling read on how to prepare special needs students for the workforce. Twitter

55 Best Back-to-School Articles for Parents, by Marilyn Price-Mitchell PhD31. Parenting Children with ADHD by Cindy Goldrich, Ed.M., at Roots of Action. Good advice on how to help children focus more, be better organized, and curb their impulsive behavior.  TwitterFacebook

32. Five Ways to Help Your Child Transition Back to School by Chynna Laird at Special-Ism. Mom of a child with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) talks about creating a transition plan for supporting special needs children. Twitter; Facebook

33. The Need to Believe in the Ability of Disability by Scott Barry Kaufman, Ph.D. and Kevin McGrew at HuffPost Education. How our beliefs help or hinder children with disabilities. Twitter

34. The 200 Best Special Education Apps by Eric Sailers at Edudemic. Great apps for teachers and parents who work with special needs children. Twitter

35. From Perfection to Personal Bests: 7 Ways to Nurture Your Gifted Child by Signe Whitson at HuffPost Parents. How to develop a growth mindset in your high-ability child. Twitter; Facebook

Homework: A Back-to-School Reality

55 Best Back-to-School Articles for Parents, by Marilyn Price-Mitchell PhD36. Reducing Homework Stress by Lori Lite at Stress Free Kids. Back-to-school and homework go together. Here are 10 tips to help parents, teens, and children with the daily homework routine. Twitter; Facebook

37. Who Takes Responsibility for Homework? What is the Parent’s Role? By Rick Ackerly at The Genius in Children.Helping kids understand the consequences and rewards of homework. Twitter; Facebook

38. Keep Your Middle Schooler Organized by Nancy Darling, Ph.D., at Psychology Today. How to help kids develop organizational skills and relieve the homework struggle. Twitter

Youth Sports

55 Best Back-to-School Articles for Parents, by Marilyn Price-Mitchell PhD39. Soccer, Baseball or Karate? Top 10 Reasons to Involve Your Kids in Sports by Signe Whitson at Psychology Today. Reasons why being a sports chauffer can pay big rewards. Twitter; Facebook

40. Emphasize the Internal Rewards by Jeffrey Rhoads at Inside Youth Sports. How to help your child experience the internal rewards of playing sports. TwitterFacebook

41. How to Help Kids Be “Winning” Losers in Youth Sports by Patrick Cohn, Ph.D., at The Ultimate Sports Parent Blog. Learn how losing in sports develops internal skills like perseverance, determination, and the ability to adapt to adversity. Twitter; Facebook

42. Heads Up Concussion In Youth Sports by Shannon Henrici at Stress Free Kids. Learn about concussions and what you can do as a parent. Twitter; Facebook

Bullying

55 Best Back-to-School Articles for Parents, by Marilyn Price-Mitchell PhD43. Mean Girls: Why Teenage Girls Can Be So Cruel by Chris Hudson at Understanding Teenagers. Learn how gender influences adolescent behavior in friendship groups and why girls have a natural tendency toward social aggression. Twitter; Facebook

44. Bully Proof Your Child by Lori Lite at Stress Free Kids. What parents can do to protect children from bullying. Twitter; Facebook

45. How to Protect Kids from Cyber-Bullying by Michele Borba, Ed.D. How to keep an electronic leash on your child! Twitter; Facebook

46. Bullying Runs Deep: Breaking the Code of Silence that Protects Bullies by Michelle Baker at HuffPost Education. A poignant and personal story with deep insights for parents. Twitter

Media & Technology

55 Best Back-to-School Articles for Parents, by Marilyn Price-Mitchell PhD

47. Parenting: Who is More Powerful: Technology or Parents? By Jim Jaylor, Ph.D., at Psychology Today. How are you flexing your parenting muscles against the strength of today’s media? Twitter; Facebook

48. How Much Television is Too Much? Science Weighs In by Todd B. Kashdan, Ph.D., at Psychology Today. Science vs. common-sense parenting. Twitter

49. Effect of Video Games on Child Development by Danielle Dai and Amanda Fry at Vanderbilt University. The positives and negatives of video games, according to research.

50. Teen Sexting: What messages should we be sending our teens about sexting? by Raychelle Cassada Lohmann, M.S., L.P.C., at Psychology Today. Learn about sexting and how to protect your teen. Twitter; Facebook

Discipline

55 Best Back-to-School Articles for Parents, by Marilyn Price-Mitchell PhD51. Is It Ever Okay to Spank a Child? by Andrea Nair at The Atlantic. Spanking is always a controversial subject. What’s your opinion? Twitter

52. What is in Your Discipline Toolbox? By Jody McVittie, M.D., at WAFCET. How to use kindness and firmness when disciplining children. TwitterFacebook

53. Why Punishment Does Not Make Good Neurological Sense by Meredith White-McMahon, Ed.D., at Development in the Digital Age. How punishment differs from discipline. Twitter

54. Connection before Correction by Jane Nelsen, Ed.D., at Positive Discipline. How positive discipline creates respectful connections with children. TwitterFacebook

55. The Trouble with Time-Outs by Deborah MacNamara, PhD. While time outs have become a popular disciplinary practice, they are not without critics. Learn why time out’s work and why they don’t. Twitter;Facebook